Things to know about your skillet

skillet recipe

I have a variety of skillet sizes so I have the right size pan for the cooking task at hand. If you’re sautéing, it’s important to have a large enough pan for the amount of food you’re cooking. If you try to sauté in a pan that’s too crowded, the food will just steam. And that defeats the purpose of sauteing, since the best part about sautéed food is the delicious caramelized bits that form where the food makes contact with the pan! Cook in batches if necessary. I like small skillets for melting butter, toasting nuts and cooking my morning egg, but I tend to use a large skillet for most everything else. (The only medium skillet I have came in the set I bought—I rarely use it. (Read more: The best skillet for your cooking needs)

Shared from Eating Well

Invest in stainless steel.
I love using stainless-steel pans because they’re strong, durable and versatile. If you’re going to drop any substantial money on a pan, let it be on the workhorse of the kitchen—a 12-inch stainless-steel skillet.

Use a nonreactive pan when cooking acidic foods.
When you cook acidic foods, such as tomatoes, lemons or cranberries, make sure to use a nonreactive pan, such as stainless-steel, enamel-coated or glass. Reactive pans, such as aluminum and cast-iron, can impart an off color and/or off flavor in acidic foods.

Interesting post: Skillet dinner recipes

Cook with less fat by using nonstick pans.
Nonstick skillets are great because you can use less oil and because delicate foods, such as fish or eggs, won’t stick to the pan or break apart. When you cook in a nonstick skillet, use nonstick-safe utensils, such as a heatproof spatula or wooden spoon—metal utensils will damage the nonstick surface. Don’t heat an empty skillet or cook over high heat, because the nonstick coating may break down at high temperatures and release potentially toxic fumes. For an alternative to conventional nonstick cookware, look for pans marketed under names like “green cookware” or “eco-friendly cookware” that are made with a nonstick coating that won’t break down when used over high heat. A cast-iron skillet is a good alternative to nonstick skillets for many recipes.

You can keep your aluminum pans.
While old research linked high aluminum intake with Alzheimer’s disease, subsequent studies on aluminum pots are few and circumstantial, and studies on antiperspirants and other aluminum-containing products are similarly slim. Today, most experts believe that aluminum’s role, if any, is small—and that diet and even crossword puzzles are far better places to focus anti-dementia energies.

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